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Category Archives: Books

#BookadayUK 19: Still Can’t Stop Talking About…

…The Assassin’s Cloak, edited by Irene and Alan Taylor. Organized chronologically, these are journal entries by the likes of Pepys, Tolstoy and Alcott, but also by those with names we don’t recognize at all. Example: a Red Cross volunteer on … Read More

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#BookadayUK 18: Bought on a Recommendation

Paint, by Grace Tiffany was highly recommended to me by an Anglo-Saxon scholar at this year’s International Congress on Medieval Studies. I have not yet started reading this novel, set in Elizabethan London. The central character is poet Emilia Bassano … Read More

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#BookadayUK 17: Future Classic

Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain, set during America’s Civil War, is one of the most brilliant, moving novels that I have ever read. Anyone who has seen the film may know the story, but the film does not convey the beauty … Read More

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#BookadayUK 16: Can’t Believe More People Haven’t Read…

…Stone’s Fall by Iain Pears. It’s historical fiction set in Venice and Paris – two cities with romantic histories and settings. What’s not to like? The plotting is brilliant: Three storytellers and a tortuous plot that is pieced together back … Read More

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#BookadayUK 15: Favourite Fictional Father

I will be interested to read what others have to say about this. Trying to respond myself was illuminating, because I could think of so few fictional fathers! Here’s the list I came up with, and my responses to them: … Read More

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#BookadayUK 14: An Old Favourite

As this is now #BookadayUK, please note the British spelling of favourite in my title. In fact, there is only one book by Austen which would not make it into this ‘old favourite’ category. That would be Mansfield Park, due … Read More

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#BookadayUK 13: Makes Me Laugh

Bill Bryson’s rumination on Britain and the British made me laugh out loud. Irreverent, off the cuff, bemused, and sometimes completely charmed by simple beauty, Bryson is wonderfully eloquent – and hilarious to boot. He’s even given a brilliant example … Read More

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#Bookaday for June 11: Secondhand Bookshop Gem

I recently purchased Pope Joan by Lawrence Durrell. I don’t know if it’s a gem because I haven’t read it yet. It was a surprise to see this on the bookstore shelf, though, because I had no idea that Durrell … Read More

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#Bookaday for June 5: Doesn’t Belong to Me

This book belongs to my next-door-neighbor. We belong to a book group and are currently reading this novel about Gerard Manley Hopkins and the event in 1875 upon which he based his poem The Wreck of the Deutschland. Five nuns, … Read More

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#Bookaday for June 4: Least Favorite Book by Favorite Author

His first book, Cold Mountain, is brilliant. He is a remarkable and talented writer, and he made me care very much about the fate of the hero of that first book. But I could find no place in my hear … Read More

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